Tag Archive | nature

Why Is It?

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As some of you may know, I drive through some pretty horrendous traffic each morning as I commute 21 miles one way, to get to school. And, I’m not the only one! Several staff members approach Hanna from both the north and south, traveling many miles each week to earn a living. Obviously, we make this drive (Did I mention the traffic?!) for many reasons beyond just earning a paycheck. I don’t know many early childhood centers I pass, to get here, yet I continue to make this drive despite frequent bumper-to-bumper traffic. Why? Because, once my feet touch our whimsical, jewel-embedded hopscotch and I pass through that funky, spring-loaded gate, my heart sings. I know that all of my beliefs regarding (Caution: buzzword!) “best practices” make up the framework for this school. Starting with a very strong and cohesive emphasis on social-emotional development, our children are happy, cooperative and collaborative. This makes it very easy to do the work I love doing, and that is following the practices inspired by the schools in Reggio Emilia, Italy.  Each day, the children and I work and play together while creating and making new discoveries. Because of this playful approach to learning, intelligence is being developed because teachers are asking questions and our curious children are testing things  out – trying this way and that, and coming up with conclusions.  

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So how does it work? How does a philosophy inspired by the schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy translate into my daily life here at Hanna?

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~ Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, it gets exciting when plans take an unanticipated turn! Whereas in a traditional school setting, the teacher makes all the plans: here at Hanna, the child is the protagonist. 

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Certainly, there are moments when the teacher is clearly in charge. Such as making decisions regarding children’s safety. But when designing curriculum, the greatest success means following the lead of a child.Such was the case when Dane found sticks in the Garden Classroom, and used them to make some shapes. Dane illustrated to us, the great potential of these sticks and how they could contribute to the 3 Day Afternoon Class study of lines. 

~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, a small group of children gathered together to solve a problem. 

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We have a great group of scientists who visit the Science Lab daily. Although they are always very excited and enthusiastic about whatever materials are available, they are not always very careful or respectful while using the substances and tools. Instead of banning these boys from the area, I turned the “problem into a project.”  I have met with this group several times, and they have come up with a list of ways on how to handle  the tools so items don’t break and various substances (such as colored water) last longer than a few minutes.

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~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I challenged the “fort builders” to design their forts before building them.

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By drawing out the plans ahead of time, this “fort builder” used his drawing skills to think and plan. His fort turned out remarkably like his plans!

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~ Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, our study of monarchs continues to engage and evolve. 

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Unlike traditional schools where a minimum time is spent on a single topic before turning to a new one, a topic (for example, our study of  monarch butterflies) can turn into a project that can go on for months and months.  After their visit with us in the fall, I had no idea where our study of monarchs would lead us. Now, more than five months later, the children are using mosaics to recreate the beautiful forms of the monarch butterfly. So far the mosaics are made out of paper, but we will soon be creating a real mosaic using ceramic plates! 

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~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I coach even our youngest artists and scientists how to use tools, instruments and materials with care because children are so capable.

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Some members of the transition class have been creating some beautiful art with watercolors.while being instructed how to clean the brush before choosing a new color and tapping the brush on the jar of color before painting to minimize drips and splattering.  

~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I continue to rejoice in being surrounded by nature and especially LOVE the beautiful gifts given to me by children gathered on their walks. 

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 Although I have always had an appreciation for nature, I never really saw the wonderful advantage of using natural materials in a classroom (other than the obligatory “science table”) before becoming a student of Reggio Emilia. Not only have I become a fan of using beautiful acorns, seedpods, stones, etc for building, art, decor and even “cooking” in the mud kitchen, many of my young students acknowledge my love of natural items and share the enthusiasm. I often receive gifts from the children with a message, “I know you will like this!”  I have received MANY gifts from Claire. She often collects pine cones and seed pods from magnolias while taking walks and then brings the treasures to me. The most recent gift was an enormous piece from a palm tree. I really need to find out what this part is called. Claire calls it a boat. This piece got a lot of attention from the recent rain after the rainwater from the roof of the Art Cottage fell into it.  We floated little bits of this and that in the water. Right away, I saw this as a piece to be filled with soil. Then it came to me, this would be the perfect container for a fairy garden! Stay tuned! 

For me, teaching at Hanna is a dream. It is not always easy work. Often, the work is slow to develop because certain children who inspired the work in the first place, don’t make it up to the Garden Classroom. There are plenty of activities going on in the lower playground that are just as meaningful and engaging. If that happens, I leave it for another day or see who else might find it interesting. Other times, I can’t keep up! Children are engaged and wanting to share their ideas left and right! I have a pile of notes waiting to be transcribed and matched up with specific projects for documentation.

 

So come tomorrow morning, I will once again buckle myself into my Toyota and head up Interstate 5. And WHEN (not if) I find myself in bumper-to-bumper traffic I won’t be upset. I will be wondering what new adventures await me beyond that sparkly hopscotch.

 With Joy! 

Francie 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As some of you may know, I drive through some pretty horrendous traffic each morning as I commute 21 miles one way, to get to school. And, I’m not the only one! Several staff members approach Hanna from both the north and south, traveling many miles each week to earn a living. Obviously, we make this drive (Did I mention the traffic?!) for many reasons beyond just earning a paycheck. I don’t know many early childhood centers I pass, to get here, yet I continue to make this drive despite frequent bumper-to-bumper traffic. Why? Because, once my feet touch our whimsical, jewel-embedded hopscotch and I pass through that funky, spring-loaded gate, my heart sings. I know that all of my beliefs regarding (Caution: buzzword!) “Best practices” make up the framework for this school. Starting with a very strong and cohesive emphasis on social-emotional development, our children are happy, cooperative and collaborative. Which makes it very easy to do the work I love doing, and that is following the practices inspired by the schools in Reggio Emilia, Italy.  Each day, the children and I work and play together while creating and making new discoveries. Because of this playful approach to learning, intelligence is being developed because teachers are asking questions and children are testing things out and coming up with conclusions. 

So how does it work? How does a philosophy inspired by the schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy translate into my daily life here at Hanna?

~ Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, it gets exciting when plans take an unanticipated turn! Sticks Dane child as protagonist

 

Certainly, there are moments when the teacher is clearly in charge. Such as making decisions regarding children’s safety. But when designing curriculum, the greatest success means following the lead of a child.

 

~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, a small group of children gathered together to solve a problem. Science rules

 

~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I challenged the “fort builders” to design their forts before building them.

~ Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, our study of monarchs continues to engage and evolve. Mosaics

~ Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I try very hard to be patient and WAIT for the children to initiate an activity.  Carrots

~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I coach even our youngest artists and scientists how to use tools, instruments and materials with care because children are so capable. Paul painting at Light Table

~Inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach, I continue to rejoice in being surrounded by nature and especially LOVE the beautiful gifts given to me by children gathered on their walks. Palm Parts.

 

For me, teaching at Hanna is a dream. It is not always easy work. Often, the work is slow to develop because certain children who inspired the work in the first place, don’t make it up to the Garden Classroom. There are plenty of activities going on in the lower playground that are just as meaningful and engaging. If that happens, I leave it for another day or see who else might find it interesting. Other times, I can’t keep up! Children are engaged and wanting to share their ideas left and right! I have a pile of notes waiting to be transcribed and matched up with specific projects for documentation.

 

So come tomorrow morning, I will once again buckle myself into my Toyota and head up Interstate 5. And WHEN (not if) I find myself in bumper-to-bumper traffic I won’t be upset. I will be wondering what new adventures await me beyond that sparkly hopscotch.

 

 

 

 

 

Thrills Found in the Unexpected

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So much of what we do as early childhood educators is provide provocations using some interesting materials in an inviting setting, and step back and observe. No pre-conceived notions; no goals; no expectations. We just provide some open-ended materials that children can interact with using their own ideas to discover and to create. Hopefully, with a little bit of scaffolding on our part (or not) new learning and a greater understanding or appreciation of such things as nature, physics, or math will occur.  I literally hold my breath when a child approaches a table presented with such things as a lump of clay and some seed pods or drawing materials and a magnifying glass near something interesting such as our resident monarch caterpillars and chrysalides.

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Sometimes the expected happens, as when clay was presented last spring and the children designed sculptures using the seed pods. But then the extraordinary happened! After I had explained to the children how slip is used (liquidized clay used as a “glue” to hold pieces of clay together) they started picking up leaves off the ground and painting them with the slip! The results were stunning! Totally unexpected and their discovery inspired me to make these leaves into a permanent art installation. You can see the finished piece in The Garden Classroom on the back fence near the Mud Kitchen.

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The new school year has begun with new materials being presented and old materials presented in new ways. Last year’s newly created Science Lab, this year’s addition of the Mud Kitchen, the Art Cottage and Outdoor Atelier continue to engage and delight the children.

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While I continue to create what I think are inviting provocations, not all are initially observed or get positive reviews There have been two wonderful exceptions (So far!) that have left me feeling really excited. I see lots of potential for artistic endeavors, creative thinking and problem solving.

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From the moment I spotted the little holes in the leaves of our milkweed plants, I knew that a marvelous journey was beginning and all of us at Hanna would be have a grandstand view of the life cycle of one of earth’s most amazing creatures – the monarch butterfly. We have not been disappointed! Most of the children knew that the caterpillars would turn into butterflies, and knew the basic biology of how that happens. Good grief!  These kids were raised on Eric Carle’s great children’s classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar! No need to dwell on this concept. What I was looking and hoping for was a “how” or a “why” to explain and explore the process. The response I got was MUCH different and so lovely. Actually, I was enchanted.“L.” is 4 years-old and attends our 5 Day program.  After drawing a newly discovered monarch chrysalis or “cocoon” as she called it, I asked her about her drawing and this is what she shared with me, without any other prompting.

“It’s a cocoon! Maybe tomorrow it’s going to get into a butterfly.

We need to make a room for it for it to live. There are all kinds of things caterpillars need when they wake up.

A leaf for their bed. There’s a nest where they poo and pee, There’s food. They can have food in a little cup.”

How profound!

This brought out all kinds of warm, fuzzy feelings in me. First of all, she pretty much summed up what Abraham Maslow described as the basic, biological and physiological needs of people, not only to survive but which must be met before they can be motivated to achieve the next level of needs.

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Second, I was so taken with L’s feelings of compassion that she expressed through her list of “needs” for this tiny, little creature. She had formed a relationship with the chrysalis, which although quite beautiful, also appears quite lifeless. L saw the potential and appreciated the future of this little green package. I’m not sure that L’s proposal of a “room” for the chrysalis/caterpillar will be very practical, but I was very excited and filled with anticipation as I approached L several days later to get more details from her.

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She was eager to draw out a plan for the room. Choosing oil pastels, L began by drawing a few rainbow hued, rectangles and enclosed them in with a square box. Besides the rainbow, it features a large window. So far, the most significant part of the window is a “rug” just like the one that covers up the window in her bedroom that she “rolls it up and down so I don’t get scared like in the middle, middle dark night.” Oh my!  We’ll talk more on Monday. I’m hoping that another naturalist and artist, B (who is also in the 5 Day program) who was representing the life cycle of the monarchs with oil pastels while L was drawing her room, will join the discussion. I wonder where this investigation will go next! It’s all pretty amazing!

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The second discovery is more serendipitous and took place in a center I created over the summer and expanded this fall. This is actually my favorite part of the Garden Classroom. It features an old-fashioned, maple, colonial style coffee table that you are more likely to find in your grandmother’s living room than in an outdoor classroom. It is now hosting a variety of natural materials such as stones, sticks, seed pods and pinecones. (I received some of them as gifts from my friends C and H in the 3 Day program.) It is also where last year’s leaf creation is being displayed.

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It was here, in this setting against the far back fence where I created what I hope was an opportunity to create without an additional enticement of glue, or clay or even play-dough.  No instructions, just a sheet of black paper behind a matting. I did provide a bit of inspiration by propping up a large format book featuring the art of environmentalist artist Andy Goldsworthy.  The cover features rocks placed in a spiral. I was just hoping that a child would discover the items and appreciate their beauty and see the potential.

 “J” from the 3 Day PM class found these items on his first day of school. I watched from afar as he placed first one stone and then another down on the black construction paper. He framed the stones with some sticks and then added a few more sticks. He was very focused and engaged and working very intentionally. None of the placements was random. Then he walked away.

I went up and admired his work and took several pictures of it as a way to create a permanent record of his lovely art. And then I walked away. 

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An hour or so later, I started to remove J’s arrangement and made a discovery. The center had lost its shade and the paper had been exposed to the sun’s rays. The sun had faded the paper around  the arrangement and created an actual memory of where J had placed the stones and sticks! Now, besides having a digitalized recording, there is an actual piece of art to share with J! J and his family have been on vacation and I have not had a chance to share his new, permanent piece of art with him. I have shared it with some other children and they have created new pieces of faded art. (For lack of a better name or at least until a name is decided by the children.) While not quite as serendipitous as J’s piece, it is still an intriguing art form. I am hoping to gather a group of children to discover their hypothesis as to how this is happening and what else is possible. I’m trying to formulate some questions to get this investigation started. Any ideas?!!!

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This is the type of work that thrills me: provoking a child’s curiosity, to get them thinking creatively and being inspired to go beyond the unexpected! 

With Joy!

Francie 

Wonder and Amazement!

 

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I just returned home from a morning spent at our annual school Pancake Breakfast.  This breakfast is more than a breakfast, it is really a celebration! We gather together each year on the first Saturday following our first week of school. We reconnect with continuing families, meet the new families, feel incredulous how former students and siblings of present students have grown and admire all the new babies who are our future students! Oh yes! We do indeed eat pancakes! Delicious ones in fact. This all has the same feeling as a family reunion. Which in fact, we are. We are a school family.

As I stood around, talking to children and parents, watching other children run around with gleeful peals of laughter, I was feeling an unusual amount of excitement and anticipation. The anticipation of new adventures! New discoveries!  New relationships with friends and materials!

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This year has a special tingling feeling to it! Three years ago Marta and Eva, the beloved teachers in Room 4, planted a butterfly garden with the help of their 2010 “Surfing Seals.”. Besides planting fennel to attract swallowtails, they planted milkweed which is the host plant for monarch butterflies. They also painted a beautiful mural featuring colorful butterflies and flowers. What a lovely invitation! Alas, we never had a butterfly stop and lay an egg. Our luck changed after a parent brought in another milkweed plant as food for some hatching butterflies in a classroom. (Thank you Brandy!) I planted the milkweed last June. We kept the plants watered over the summer break, and VIOLA! After returning to school after our break, we spotted the little, teeny, tiny caterpillars. We were thrilled! And we could not wait to share these precious creatures with the children.

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Our first week of school was spent observing, drawing, and being amazed at the rate of growth. Although the children were very tender, we had to warn them that the caterpillars could not be handled. Holding them obstructs their breathing. I provided small decorative butterflies and models representing the stages of a butterfly that could be handled. We are also making our own little caterpillars out of paper- mache.

Meanwhile, “mommy” monarchs continue to deposit more eggs. We have been delighted by their fluttering, bright copper dance as they circled around the Garden Classroom for a delicate landing on the milkweed to lay one more egg.

As the week progressed our caterpillar “nursery” got demolished by the youngsters. (I purchased two more plants, so we have four milkweeds in all.) They nibbled the leaves down to the bare branches. Marta reassured me that we do not need to purchase any more plants and the plants we do have will grow back.

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On Friday, we spotted our first chrysalis. It is a beautiful green with golden spots. We suspect there will be more on Monday.  The caterpillars are starting on their individual journeys up the wall and down to the ground.  I was able to watch a small group of Transition kiddos observing a caterpillar travel down a board and over the cement barrier. Barely two years old and these young naturalists were sharing their hypotheses on where it was going. One child said, “To work.” And of course, he was right! It’s GOT to be hard work to metamorphosis into a butterfly!

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I read where it takes an egg approximately 30 days to develop into a butterfly. As is our practice, I will be refraining from giving this information to the children and have them record and hypothesize about their development instead. Although the children knew right off that these were caterpillars and they will turn into butterflies, I am hoping that I can have some conversations with the children where we can pursue their ideas, not just factual but also fanciful of how this process works. While the monarchs have given us an amazing opportunity for study, I hope they can serve as an opening to inspire deeper thinking, greater creativity and a chance to wonder and be amazed.

 “The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.”

                                                                                                 Albert Einstein

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I am so glad that I had a chance to spend time with some of you at our Hanna Open House and Pancake Breakfast.  It was such a pleasure to share with you the excitement of the monarch caterpillars. But really, the caterpillars only serve as another opportunity to touch the heart and mind of the children who enter the Garden Classroom. I’m looking forward to celebrating each and every day spent with the children in my “school family.”

With Joy and Anticipation!

Francie

 

 

For the Birds!

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For months, our beautiful, tranquil Garden Classroom has been overwhelmed by  the terrible noise coming from road work being done on Highway 101 that backs up to the school property. As we approach spring, the noise has finally dissipated and we have heaved a great sign of relief! We are particularly grateful because many children have been working on several projects to welcome the song birds back to the Garden Classroom. Although a couple of crows show up regularly scrounging up leftovers from the children from the transition class who eat lunch in the Garden Classroom while waiting for their brothers and sisters from the 5 day class get out of class, we have not seen a single sign of any song birds nibbling from our feeders.

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To help the birds feel welcome, I have offered several resources to entice the children to learn more about birds and their behaviors and invite them to create some amenities to make the birds want to visit and enjoy their stay.

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A favorite book, Smithsonian: Bird Watcher by David Burnie has provided many ideas for attracting birds and inspired our young naturalists from the 3 Day afternoon class to create a simple bird bath. This book also inspired several children to create hanging bird feeders using plastic water bottles. .

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I have invited the children to take a close look at several bird’s nest I have collected and invited them to create a list of materials the birds used to make their nests. We have started to gather similar items and put them in a metal suet holder as a way to provide nesting materials for our new (hopefully!) birdie friends.

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One of the more ambitious and creative projects is creating a welcome sign for the birds that lets the birds know that food is available. This sign will include messages such as, “Birdies! Have food there!”, “Eat it! It’s good for you!” and “Only birds!”

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Besides providing food, shelter and water for birds and butterflies we have met the needs to qualify to be certified as a wildlife habitat for the National Wildlife Federation! I will be filling out the form and in the process, provide pictures of our beautiful environment and tell the story of how the children of Hanna have created a lovely, TRANQUIL refuge for the wildlife AND people!

 

 

A Field Trip

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As much as I love spending each and every day in The Garden Classroom, I had an opportunity to visit one of our local treasures and couldn’t pass it up!

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Home  by Turkish sculptor  Ali Acerol (1930-2007)

Before I tell you about my outing, I want to share with you that I did a little internet hunt to try to figure out what the word “Encinitas” means but with no clear cut results. My own description of Encinitas (coming from this southlander from San Diego) is AMAZING! Since I not only visited the Lux Art Institute with The Surfing Seals (Room 4) located in Encinitas, I also visited San Diego Botanical Gardens this week ALSO located in Encinitas! Each of these places is a wonderful opportunity to get in touch with nature and art. They are simply MAGICAL!

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Horse donated by the Del Mar Foundation, painted by the kids at Summer Art Camp 2008

On Wednesday morning I joined the children and teachers from Room 4 and had my first experience visiting the Lux Art Institute off on Encinitas Blvd. I joined The Surfing Seals for a morning of exploring the beautiful outdoor art installations found on a lovely meandering pathway and inside the museum to meet the current artist-in-residence Carlos Vega.

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Mother Maple by Robert Lobe was created from 1987-1988

There was a culminating experience where each child created a piece of art reminiscent of Vega’s work involving engraving on metal.
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This is PERFECT opportunity to introduce children to the museum experience. Although children (Or anyone for that matter!) couldn’t touch Vega’s art,  Carlos  explained why and answered the children’s questions or responded to their comments in a complete and charming manner.

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Birdhouse II by Joan Bankemper

Outside on the pathway, each piece is responsive to a child’s senses and they could easily relate to the object’s beauty or whimsy. While there is a small fee to view and visit with the artist inside the museum (Well worth the experience!) the nature-sculpture path is free. (We were not able to take photos of Vega’s art – you will just have to go visit him at the Lux and see his art for yourself!)

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One of the beautiful  specimens seen at San Diego Botanical Gardens

On Friday, Sarah treated all of the teachers at Hanna Fenichel to a “mini retreat” at the San Diego Botanical Gardens (Formally Quail Gardens) for an hour of relaxation and inspiration amongst the beautiful flora and lovely art. I have visited the gardens several times in the past was still amazed at new displays and even lusher surroundings.

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One of the wonderful sculptures seen at San Diego Botanical Gardens

New for me, was the Hamilton Children’s Garden. An earlier visit inspired some of the features in The Garden Classroom such as our fountain.
Both the Lux Art Institute and San Diego Botanical Gardens are located just minutes from Hanna Fenichel and offer wonderful outings and rich experiences. I plan on taking advantage of the close vicinity to both and give myself a mini retreat on a regular basis!

http://www.luxartinsitute.org
http://www.SDBGarden.org

It’s Raining! It’s Pouring!

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One of the most frequent questions I get concerning The Garden Classroom is, “What do we do if it rains?” Rainy days are really my favorite days!
Rainy days are the best days to take advantage of the beautiful Art Cottage. I have filled it with what I love best and reflects the spirit of The Garden Classroom. As you walk through the door, objects gathered on my walks and hikes in the city (mostly Balboa Park) and mountains are set up for the children to explore.

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Here and there are little treasures that the children have started to bring me from their own backyards and outings. These little items are what I love best! They represent that their appreciation of nature is growing and they will never have to suffer from what Richard Louv describes in his book, Last Child in the Woods as “nature deficient.”

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Various pieces of art are displayed representing our current investigation and several explorations from the past.

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Being in the Art Cottage on a rainy day means a gathering of friends, surrounded by nature engaged with art, literature and conversation. As the rain drums on the roof and deck, we sit cozily together and make new discoveries about each other and explore our theories concerning whatever topic is “on the table.”
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I set up the Art Cottage with 2 or 3 activities and which accommodates 4-6 children at a time.
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The light table is entices the children with its warm light. It is set up with an art project or colorful materials that glow with the light.
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A rainy day is the perfect time to work on an ongoing investigation such as our current project featuring rainbows. One topic we have been exploring is “What does the color indigo look like?” A committee agreed with Hayley who said it is dark blue. She knew this information because she learned a song about rainbows at her birthday party!

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Another cozy activity available in the Art Cottage on a rainy day is a favorite for anyone… reading books.

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So if you are ever have a moment, join us, rain or shine in The Garden Classroom!

A Winter Wonderland

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It may not always be appropriate to add “snow” to an emergent style curriculum such as we use at Hanna, since snow really isn’t a part of our landscape, but considering that nature inspires so much of what we do in the Garden Classroom, I did think it would be appropriate to spend our last couple of days before starting our winter break celebrating the winter’s solstice. With some help of several girls from Room 3, we experienced some seasonal changes in the much beloved “deer” play tray. (While it really features lots of forest animals, it is the little deer family that gets the most attention.)

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The little colored, plastic leaves were raked out and some faux snow was sprinkle on to the forested habitat. The children were invited to paint and glitter some pine cones as a way to enrich and personalize the forest.

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I also turned the sensory table into an Arctic play land for little plastic polar bears and other animals that reside in the North Pole. Two of my mentors, Deb Curtis and Margie Carter taught me that something “sparkly…or wondrous and magical” (Designs for Living and Learning, 2003) should always be included, so sparkly silver and blue pom-poms  and glittered,  silver spirals (I cut them off floral picks)  were added along with some blue and white florists stones.
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To top it all off, I included a large plastic, party tray that had the appearance of a sheet of ice. This created a whole new level of interaction! The polar bears, seals and whales had parties “underneath the ice.”

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While looking at these photos, I can’t help but smile. I know that playing with this material is nothing like playing in real snow Yet, the children’s interactions with the fluffy, white stuff caused a flurry of falling flakes and piling drifts. While this play could certainly be described as educational, (For example, math skills are being strengthened as the children sort, count and create patterns and sets while playing with the plastic animals and social-emotional development is occurring through conflict resolution and negotiating taking turns.) what I find so delightful is that these children are experiencing the same kind of joy that a child might experience on opening the front door and discovering a real winter wonderland while living in say…New England. Their faces shine with a look of wonder and their laughter rings with joy. Children everywhere recognize this weather phenomenon and understand the magic of snow!